15 benefits only a personal trainer can provide

There are so many reasons why a Personal Trainer is essential to achieving your fitness goals, whether they be weight loss-based, sports-driven or for athletic purposes. Here, we’ve put together the most critical reasons why you should have a Personal Trainer, as well as the benefits that you are likely to achieve.

1. It’s Educational

One of the primary reasons that someone should have a Personal Trainer is that they are trained in teaching others how to exercise. And while exercise in itself is only a part of fitness, with nutrition and lifestyle playing an essential role in the overall picture if you don’t get exercise right then you will never achieve your goals.

The importance of education when exercising is important for two primary reasons:

1) If you don’t know which exercises are most effective for the goals you have, you are unlikely to achieve those goals. For example, if your goal is to build core strength but you spend all your time on cardio exercises, then you are unlikely to hit your goal.

2) Education when performing exercises is essential in reducing the risk of injury. Many people every year are seriously injured by performing exercises they have not received training for, and this can impact their health and fitness for a long time. Having someone trained in how to execute certain tasks will greatly reduce the level of risk and increase the effectiveness of your fitness routine.

2. They Help Perfect Form

Having a Personal Trainer beside you to demonstrate the correct posture and technique is invaluable. A Personal Trainer will ensure clients are performing exercises correctly and efficiently, in order to maximise results. If your form when exercising is not correct, then you are at increased risk of injury as well as not achieving your goals (because nothing kills a dream like 10 weeks of prescribed bed rest!).

3. They Can Help With Your Unique Requirements

Everybody is different, and that means everyone’s abilities and requirements are different when it comes to exercise. This could be anything from having an old injury that requires special exercises to having a phobia that may impact on where or how you workout.

For example, if you have an old knee injury that required surgery, but since then you haven’t done anything to rebuild the muscles or improve mobility, then you are going to need different exercises and goals than an athlete who is training to run a marathon. This is where a Personal Trainers experience can make a huge difference to your training program.

4. They Help You Set Realistic Goals

Everyone wants to achieve their goals straight away, whether they be weight loss, cheese grater abs or Hulk-like strength. But these are not always achievable, and if you don’t hit them then you may be discouraged and backslide.

A Personal Trainer will not only help you set realistic goals that you will be able to achieve – if you put in the effort, of course – but they will also be able to keep you on track to hit those goals. For example, if your goal is to achieve a ‘bikini body’ for summer, it’s not just about doing 100 crunches a day for a month to work your abs. It’s about altering your diet to eat the correct foods, mixing cardio and weights to work the right muscles, and setting a timeframe in which this can be achieved.

5. They Can Help With Specific Goals, Such As Training For An Event

As well as helping their clients set realistic goals, Personal Trainers are the perfect tool to help you achieve a specific goal. This is ideal for those who are training for a specific event, or need to achieve a certain level of fitness before they are able to do something they really want.

For example, if you have a bucket list with ‘Skydiving’ on it but are over the maximum weight, then hiring a Personal Trainer to assist with helping you lose weight is a great start to achieving this goal. Or if your goal is to be able to run a marathon in six months, then hiring a Personal Trainer to put you on the right track could be all you need to complete a marathon.

6. They Hold You Accountable

How many times have you gone to bed and said to yourself, ‘Tomorrow I’m going to wake up, go to the gym, and do an hour workout before I get ready for work’, and then woken up and decided to sleep for another hour instead of exercising?

This is where a Personal Trainer is critical to ensuring that you commit and stick to your fitness goals. If you’ve made an appointment to meet you trainer for a session, then you are far more likely to still go than if you are just telling yourself you should go to the gym.

7. No Wasted Time = Maximum Results

There are two types of people who go to the gym:

1) Those who wander in, spend 10 minutes on one machine and then drift slowly over to another, before half-heartedly trying bicep curls for five reps and then walking out.

2) Those who have a plan in mind, and hit the machines with a purpose. They generally have a set amount of reps they do in sets of two or three, and they’ll know exactly what they’re doing on each machine.

It’s fairly obvious that the first group will not be achieving their fitness goals unless they get some help and have someone to direct them, so if you know that you’re one of those people then you should be enlisting the help of a Personal Trainer ASAP.

8. It’s Not Just Fitness They Can Help With

When completing their Certificate III in Fitness, every student is required to complete a module on nutrition and how it can affect fitness. Personal Trainers who complete their Certificate IV in Fitness have to then complete additional work on nutrition, and a number of Personal Trainers also add on additional education to their program by completing a Nutrition course such as those offered by the Australian Institute of Fitness.

By choosing a Personal Trainer who has undergone specific nutrition education, you know that they will be providing the right nutritional advice to achieve your goals.

9. They Improve Your Mental Health

It has long been known that physical exercise can help with mental health issues such as depression, and that it is a recommended part of treatment by many medical health professionals. Having a Personal Trainer to help with your exercise plan when you suffer from mental health problems can help with motivation, with choosing the right exercises to release the most endorphins, and also just to have another shoulder to lean on.

Which leads us to our next point…

10. They’re An Unofficial Therapist

Let’s be honest, most of the time when exercising with your Personal Trainer you will be telling them about your week, how work is going, and what’s wrong with your life at the time. This is normal!

A Personal Trainer is there to help with your fitness goals, yes, but they’re also there to help improve your overall wellbeing. They care about how stressed you are, because that will impact how motivated you are in your sessions. They care if you’re unhappy in a relationship, as this could result in eating unhealthily.

There are myriad ways in which having a Personal Trainer can be like having an unofficial therapist.

11. They Help You Form Good Habits

It can take weeks to form good habits, and even longer to break bad ones – and trying to do it on your own is hard work. Having a Personal Trainer is like having a good angel on your shoulder encouraging you in the right direction. They can help to argue with the bad angel in your head, and keep you on track to achieve your fitness goals.

12. Personalised Training Plan

There are always going to be some exercises that you enjoy more than others, beyond simple capability. For example, just because you can physically do burpees doesn’t mean that you always want to, but you might really like doing squat jumps and sit ups instead.

A Personal Trainer will be able to tailor your training plan to suit you and what you enjoy, as well as encourage you to do the exercises that are best to achieve your goals.

As well as this, there are always going to be some days when the last thing you feel like doing is a hard workout, and so having a Personal Trainer means that they can tailor your exercise for that day to both accommodate your mood while still making the session helpful.

13. They Fit Into Your Schedule

Regardless of whether the only time you have available to train is at a ridiculously early hour before work, or on your lunch break, or mid-afternoon before the kids come home from school – a Personal Trainer is one of the most versatile professions in terms of hours. They understand that different people have different availabilities, and so they will tailor appointment times to suit you.

14. Increased Flexibility For Location

Not everyone enjoys the atmosphere of a crowded gym, or having to wait for the machine you want to use to become available. The benefit of having a Personal Trainer is that you aren’t limited to working out where equipment is available – not only will your PT have some equipment that they can bring with them, but you can also choose the location in which you exercise.

Whether it’s in the comfort of your own home or in your neighbourhood park, with a Personal Trainer you have the flexibility to workout wherever suits you best.

15. They Challenge You

Are you getting bored with your fitness routine? Have you progressed beyond the exercises you know and have plateaued in your fitness? A Personal Trainer is what you need to take you to the next level, and continuously challenge your abilities.

Don’t think you can lift that medicine ball?

Positive you won’t fit back into your favourite dress?

Doubt you’ll be able to compete in a charity run next year?

A Personal Trainer is your life coach, nutrition guide and encourager all in one, and without them your fitness goals are that much harder to achieve. So what are you waiting for? Find a professional Personal Trainer today to help achieve your fitness goals.

Credit: https://fitness.edu.au/15-benefits-personal-trainer/

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Joining client with the back end service

Bridge

Sooner or later any Android, iOS or Windows application wants to get outside of the local hardware box and start to communicate with the outside world. In case of our application we new that already from the very beginning that we are going to have a back-end web services in one or another way. At the beginning of the project, after the user requirements were set, and the architecture of the solution designed, it seamed quite straight forward to implement our back-end services. Bellow is the architecture we decided to use for our Fitradar system.

But in the process of the implementation we realized that quite often we have to adjust our back-end web services API. So in this article I want to share some experience we had while joining our client applications with back-end web services.

Initial approach

First we divided the whole system in 4 sub-projects:

  • Android application
  • iOS application
  • back-end web services application
  • the project website application

and created 3 teams. We thought the client application teams and web services team will be able to work independently after the APIs and data contracts on the web services were defined. Once we received the UI designs we started to model web services API and data contract between the applications. And when the data contract between the applications was defined the back-end team started to work on the web service implementation, meanwhile application teams started to work on the UI (User Interface) part.

We estimated that by the time application teams will complete one use case UI, back-end team will implement the web services for that use case to the degree that they can start to receive and send data.  The first use case we picked up was user profile creation. The interaction between the client application and back end services went smoothly. Web service received the user profile data and stored that in the database. So we took the next use case – displaying full user profile information to the profile owner and limited information to other application users.

The problem

As we started we thought it will go fast and smooth since all we needed was to fetch already stored data from our web service. But soon we discovered that the data coming from the web service is not complete. We needed to display some statistics about the user activity. Since on early stage of development and user requirement gathering we new very little how the statistics will be calculated, we assumed that some of them we will be able to calculate in the clients application and some we will be calculated on the back-end server. It turned out that some statistics we were not be able to calculate in the client’s application and we needed to fetch more data from the server but on the other hand to calculate statistics on the back-end server we needed more input data from the user during the profile creation. So we had to change the data contract for the user profile creation and for user profile fetching web service end points. And when was the time to move to the next use case – sport event creation, we decided to call for a meeting to find a better approach.

Different approach

After some brainstorming we decided that both teams should work simultaneously on one or two use cases. When we had to work on use case that shows some data we kept an eye on the use case that sends this data to the back-end web service.  It means that we always started with the use case that fetches data from the web service and displays data to user. Application team started with UI that was unambiguous, since we had UI designs and we new quite well what we want to see in the UI. In the development process along with UI layout View Model was created. This View Model clearly defined what data we need in order to meet the design and functional requirements. Now we could see what business layer entities can provide the required data. And once the entities were defined for the use case we could tell what endpoint we need and more important what data these endpoints should provide. So at this point the data contract for fetching data was quite stable (it had some minor changes later nevertheless, but mostly because we decided to introduce change in UI design).  And the back-end team now could see if they can provide the required data form the data they will gather. If something was missing on the server the back-end team adjusted the data contract for incoming data accordingly.

To make this process more smoothly and allow the teams to work independently as much as possible application team instead of real network calls used mock objects that returned the required data. And the same did the back-end team for incoming data.

Another thing that back-end team had to keep in mind was, if we really should be the ones that provide the requested data. For example, after user profile use case analysis it quickly became clear that we should delegate the user’s profile picture storage to third party services like Cloude Storage

Conclusion

The one thing we learned is that the more complex project is the more difficult is to come up with precise requirements. We were familiar with the agile development model and applied it extensively on the project bases, but we thought that the interface between the client and the back-end is clear from the initial requirements. We were wrong, the web service interface was changed in several iterations because the discovered more requirements for the client application. So the conclusion we made is that for bigger projects we have to apply iterative development approach for the whole system, we can’t really make the projects independent from each other. We had to check the initial web service interface after each implemented use case and see if we need to make changes there. So are final web service API and data contracts after several use cases looked quite different than that we designed in the beginning.

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The benefits of being a personal trainer

Are you interested in a career in personal training? Here are some of the amazing benefits that come with this career!

Stay healthy

Whether you work in a gym or at home, you will be able to stay healthy and keep in shape whenever you have some free time. This could be at the start of your day or when you are waiting for your next client. You will have all the proper equipment you need and keeping in shape will attract more clients!

Help other people

One of the main benefits of being a personal trainer is that every day you help your clients achieve their goals and become fitter, healthier and more confident. You have the ability to help your clients change their lives for the better and that is very fulfilling.

Turn your passion into a career

If you decide to become a personal trainer because you are passionate about health and fitness then this is the perfect career as you will be able to do something you love every day. You will have the knowledge and skills to teach other people and help them improve their lives whilst fitting in some time to workout yourself.

Career Opportunities

You can work in a gym, health club, sports club, hotel, on a cruise ship or you could even set up your own business and work in your own gym. The opportunities are endless and personal trainers can work almost anywhere in the world!

Meeting new people

You will meet and work with all sorts of people being a personal trainer. The social side makes the job very interesting and you will also have to help clients with different needs and goals so each day will be different.

Choose your own hours

If you work for yourself, you can set your own hours and enjoy a flexible schedule. However, you should consider clients who may only be able to train early in the morning or late at night due to being at work during the day. However, you can still choose which hours suit you best and you wont have the same work hours every single day.

P.S. Visit our website and join the mailing list! Our app is coming soon:

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Source: https://www.velocity-pt.co.uk/blog/benefits-personal-trainer/

 

Keeping the code growth under control

The other day I had a discussion with one of our team members about how to keep classes readable and don’t end up with huge files containing thousands of lines and hundreds of methods. It turns out that this question deals with the very basics of Object Oriented programming and I decided to give my view on some of the OOP principles that help me keep a code growth maintainable and get my code to comply with good design principles. One of the first principles that comes to my mind is Single responsibility principle (SRP) that states “Each software module should have one and only one reason to change”. Frankly for a long time I had a hard time to apply this description to daily code and therefore I came up with my own steps derived from other OOP principles that help me to follow this principle.

Starting Point

Since lately I was developing either webservices, websites or mobile applications then my starting point is one of the widely acknowledge architectural patterns It gives me a good starting point with project structure and files, where I can start to add a code. For this moment these patterns are well established and I really suggest to go with one of these design patterns unless you are developing a very simple application and don’t have plans to evolve the project. And if you know the project will be something more than delegating CRUD requests to the database, then it is worth to start already with layered project structure where Model in MVC, MVP or MVVM is organized in Business Models, Services and Repositories. And maybe even consider the whole Domain Driven Development approach. But how to estimate the starting architecture for the application is a topic for another article.

Single responsibility principle for methods

Then next I start to fill provided methods (actions in controllers in case of web-services or activity’s lifecycle methods in case of Android application) and observe how my starting methods evolve. These methods are placed where I start to apply the Single responsibility principle for methods. Once I have methods that have only one reason to change I switch my focus to classes. And here are some rules I follow to achieve SRP in my methods:

  • DRY (don’t repeat yourself). If I discover that several methods share a common piece of code I extract the common code in a separate method and make it reusable for other methods. I think this is one of the first principles of clean code most of the developers learn. And since this principle is so fundamental then many IDEs included the method extraction as part of their refactoring tool set.
  • I check whether there are common variables more than one method is operating on. If there are such variables I make them class level private fields. I repeat this step every time when a new method is extracted. And if several classes have common fields or extracted methods then it is time for new base class.
  • I make sure the methods I extract are doing what its name suggests. If a method’s name contains one verb then I make sure the method is either command that changes the state of the object or it returns data. And if the method name contains more than one verb it is obvious that the method is doing more than one thing. Sometimes it is acceptable. For example in cases when I write logs along the method’s basic logic. If tools or frameworks allow handling such method side behavior I extract it as an aspect.
  • I respect the levels of abstraction and try to keep method statements on the same abstraction level. One sign of that I might be violating this rule are a long loop and if bodies. The statements in long bodies most likely belong to lower level abstraction than the statements outside the loop or if. But sometimes on high-level method I have to call a single line of lower abstraction code, then I leave it.
  • I keep the number of method arguments short. If I need more than 2 arguments, then maybe it is time for new class, and instead of several primitive types, I should be passing a class as a method argument.
  • And finally, I use cohesion level description to match my methods against different cohesion types and see that I am avoiding Procedural, Logical, and Coincidental Cohesion.

Single responsibility principle for classes

As code evolves I start to have more and more methods in classes provided by initial architecture and fields in those classes. Now I check if it is not the time to split my classes. For a long time, I had a hard time to choose the right class for a method. And one of the reason were examples I was reading about in books and articles on the Internet. Those examples were focusing mainly on the names of methods and classes and how by names estimate the relationships between methods. But soon I discovered that using only names can lead to subjective decisions. Although many OOP principles are subjective from my point of view anyway (in case of SRP someone could argue that keeping all methods in one class is more convenient than creating a hierarchy of classes, and one should use an IDE for navigation between the methods instead of file system navigator) I wanted to use something measurable that would allow me to estimate how tight the relationship between a method and its containing class is. And one of such metrics I found is cohesion. Low cohesion means methods inside the class are independent of each other. On the other hand, high cohesion means methods in the class are strongly related. But how can we express this relationship in numbers? It turns out there are several cohesion metrics that give a developer insight into relationships between methods. And sometimes distributing methods to classes according to the cohesion level among them, one can discover new classes, he didn’t even think about before. And here are the description of some of the cohesion metrics. The metric I am using the most is “Lack of Cohesion of Methods” (LCOM) metric, that for each field in a class counts the number of methods that reference it. Then it sums up the number of methods and divides the result with a count of methods times the count of fields and subtract the result from one, like this: 1 – (NumberOfMethodsReferencingFields /(NumberOfMethods * NumberOfFields)). The metric ranges from 0 to 1, where 0 means high cohesion and 1 low cohesion.

Following these rules, I was able to achieve the Single Responsibility principle in my modules.

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Another programming language!

During the last year while searching and exploring code examples of Android’s new technologies like Jet pack architecture components our team noticed that more and more code on the git hub is posted only in Kotlin – the new programming language for Android platform. And that raised a question in our team, is this new kid on the block something that can speed up our app development even more and we should start to prepare for another transition? And as usually we started to explore and see what benefits the new language can bring. But for me all this recalled my own experience with programming languages and how I was switching between different languages.

My first encounter with programming happened at high school and the first language I learned was BASIC. The friendship with BASIC lasted only a year. When I started to study at university I switched to Pascal. Yes, that was quite long time ago. At that time most of the software I was producing was dealing with mathematics and were command line utilities. I didn’t see a much difference between those two languages except that now in Pascal along the variables I had to declare their types. The course at university was organised so that students had to start with some high level language and gradually switching to C/C++. So far in the length of time I was switching from simple to more complex languages, and at that point of time it didn’t seem that switching to more complex language would ease the programming process, on the contrary the C/C++ comparing with BASIC made it harder to write software that solve mathematical problems. And that was the first time when I learned about the Programming domain. C/C++ gave me the ability to write software for almost any domain. But at the same time for some tasks more high level languages were preferable. After C/C++ followed SQL and Java, then C# and JavaScript. When I switched from C++ to Java the same task could take 10-25% less coding. Now the operations with text were easier and all pointers were gone. When I learned C# and that was the time when Microsoft released C# version 2.0, but Oracle had Java 1.5 I noticed in cases where callbacks and events where used in C# I could type 5-10% less code. But this increase in productivity was only in certain programming domains, like Windows applications. In other areas like embedded systems or OS C was still the main option, and the arise of new languages didn’t really affect those fields. The main conclusion I made for myself was that if a new language emerges, then most likely it speeds up development only in certain domain.

And what about Kotlin? The creators of Kotlin JetBrains claim that replacing Java with Kotlin will allow developers be more productive. After playing with Kotlin little bit and converting some existing Android classes into Kotlin we saw that it could really be the case. Then we looked at oficial Kotlin’s documentation where Kotlin is compared with Java and although some of the features we are really missing in Java like Data classes, Null-safety and Extensions we didn’t really see anything groundbreaking. And we were about to put Kotlin aside for this project since :

  • our team doesn’t feel yet so comfortable with Kotlin that we could produce code that is easy readable and follow best practices. To master the language requires time.
  • The productivity we would gain would not outweigh the time we would spent on learning the new language

We assumed if we want to switch to the new language we have to convert the whole application code base to the new language and keep coding in Kotlin, but then we noticed this tutorial saying that we can mix Java and Kotlin in one project. And we saw this as a good opportunity some of the files write in Kotline. And one of the first candidates for Kotlin we chose entities and DTO. It requires to learn very few new syntax and classes can be made much smaller thanks to getting rid of getters and setters. We decided to spend some time on learning Kotlin and once we learn the feature that really reduces the number of code lines and brings something valuable in code comparing with Java we will write that peace of code in Kotlin. In such way we hope we can keep the same development speed while learning new language and at some point of time start to reduce the development time comparing with Java. It worked well in time when I switched from C/C++ to Java and now it looks like it is time to switch from Java to Kotlin.

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